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Thanks

A hearty thanks to all of you who supported the Historical Village this year. We weren’t entirely sure when we decided to switch to an online shop from our typical holiday bazaar, what might happen. We certainly didn’t expect such an outpouring of generosity from those who purchased our handmade items, and hard work from those who made all the items. Cathryn’s pine needle baskets sold so fast she had to make a few more (which also sold very quickly). Lynda’s huckleberry jams disappeared in a few days as did the special dog treats. The quilters were thoroughly delighted to sell three quilts (two of our tied flannel ones and one lovely hand stitched one that Sally pieced). And you probably missed Renata’s blue starry quilt that was bought up in a flash. There was a run on embroidered dish towels and Jan and Carmen’s lovely Christmas ornaments. Cathy’s spicy peach jam was a big hit as were the hand felted pouches that Carol made. Proceeds from all sales go to the maintenance of the Historical Village. So as you wrap the baby quilt or the toasty scarf that you bought from our online store – you are actually giving twice. Once to the fortunate recipient of your gift, and once to the Historical Village. When you see the old church being painted or a new roof going on the Baney House, please know you are part of making that happen. Oh – and just in case you need a last minute gift, the online shop is still up and running and the quilters are at the old school house every Friday for you to pick up your purchases.

We so appreciate the support from the community. And that was another delight we discovered from having an online store – how far our community actually reaches. Orders came in from Seattle, New York, Kentucky and Israel! It is truly heartwarming to see how many people far and wide appreciate the Historical Village and our efforts. Thank you very much. May you and yours enjoy this season and all we look forward to in 2021.

https://tobacco-valley-board-of-history.square.site/

This Year’s (online) Bazaar

We were tempted to post a photo of a dog rather then the table laden with wonderful items made by the women at the Historical Village. We seriously thought of boasting about old dogs learning new tricks but decided it made more sense to just tell you about the awesome bazaar we’ve set up for you.

Follow the link from the Tobacco Valley Board of History website to our spanking new online store (it says Shop at the top of our Home page). Yes, it will have everything you typically enjoyed at our annual holiday bazaar. Cathryn Schroeder’s pine needle baskets, scrubbies, lovely potholders, embroidered dish towels, and yummy jams. Of course there are quilts – baby quilts, tied flannel quilts, quilts with vintage tops, and quilts hand stitched by the Friday quilters. Actually you should just go to the store now to see everything we have because…..well, there is a lot!

It is truly an online store where you pick out things you want to purchase, and then click on the little shopping cart to check out. The store takes credit cards so that makes it easy. You pay online for your items and then any Friday that is convenient, between the hours of 10:00am and 3:00pm you can stop by the old school house in the Historical Village to pick up your order. Do you work between 10-3 and can’t make it to the Village? No problem. Get in touch and we will arrange an alternate pick up time. And guess what? The online bazaar officially opens November 20 so that gives you plenty of time to purchase those lovely items you want to send to friends and family. And because its an online bazaar, you can shop 24/7. Insomnia? Not a problem – get your shopping done anytime while supporting the Historical Village.

Because as always, 100% of these sales support the Historical Village. So with every purchase, you help us maintain the grounds, keep the buildings looking great and pay the bills. So thank you for your purchases! And if you happen to be a minimalist who really doesn’t want anything more (although the upcycled wreaths Lynda made are really fun), its even possible to make a donation to the Tobacco Valley Board of History from our online store.

We are so excited about this endeavor. But to be clear, we are unable to gift wrap and/or ship items you purchase. We are a small group of volunteers and making all these beautiful items (did we mention huckleberry preserves and Cathy’s spicy peach jam?) and managing the online store is what we are capable of now. We are confident you can wrap your own gifts or support our local UPS store if you need any help with shipping. If you live out of the Tobacco Valley and want to purchase something, get in touch with someone you know locally who can pick your items up and arrange to get them to you.

Always a treat to see the Historical Village stretch into the 21st century! Look forward to helping you find perfect delights for everyone on your list. New things will be added weekly so be sure to check back (the cute catnip toys and homemade dog treats are available now!).

https://tobacco-valley-board-of-history.square.site/

We call it home

Recently the quilters at the Historical Village got some press. There was a wonderful article in Montana Arts Council’s State of the Arts quarterly newspaper. Locals who saw the articles were thrilled. And even some folks from out of the area read about these hard-working women. There were various follow-up conversations about the quilters and what they do, which got us thinking more seriously about why we are excited for the press, what exactly is our story?

There have been women quilting at the Historical Village since the mid 1970s. It would be hard to imagine how many stitches have been done in that amount of time. Let’s just say countless. Of course, the women enjoy getting together on Fridays to quilt, share ideas and laughter, but they also realize their goal is to preserve the Historical Village. They do this with the money they raise through their quilting, with the information about the valley they share with each other and the visitors who stop by, and with maintenance of all the archives under the care of the Tobacco Valley Board of History.

And this is what they have been guardians of for nearly fifty years. So if you stop by the Historical Village today, you see buildings that have been well maintained. You can ask for photos and we will go through our files to find one that shows Fortine in the early 1900s or the first saw mill in the valley. You can bring your children to the museum in the summer to see examples of things you or your parents or your grandparents used. And recently we updated our collection of over two hundred oral histories (taped interviews and some written transcripts). You can think of us as the Keepers of the Hearth.

But is that our story? Or is that just who we are? The story for us at this moment in time seems to be a mystery – who will continue to keep this hearth burning bright in the future? There is lots of support for our membership drive and we are very appreciative of the money people donate to help the Historical Village with expenses. But there needs to be a treasurer to handle that money, and a secretary to deal with paperwork. Who can arrange for ground maintenance in the summer, shovel snow in the winter or find volunteers for trash pick-up? Are there individuals who want to sit around on Fridays listening to stories so they will be able to pass them on thirty years from now?

If you read our story, it involves searching for clues, talking with a stranger in some dark cafe, tracking down information to solve the mystery of who will be the keepers in the future of this place we call home. Do we follow bread crumbs? Take hints from Lois Lowry’s young adult novel, The Giver? Perhaps find clues in Robert Putnam’s lament about the decline of social capital? Any help to solve this mystery will be greatly appreciated.

Summer in the valley

It is not a typical summer by any stretch.  But if you stop by the Historical Village, you can still laze in the cool grass under the trees appreciating a bit of calmness as the children swing nearby.  Although the museum buildings aren’t opeIMG_8556n to the public this year, the grounds beckon.  Locals hang out there with picnics and to have a lovely space for children. Visitors from out of the area stop by to stretch their legs and look at the old buildings, learn a bit about at our community’s history.

Since the museum isn’t open this year, it means less income from sales and donations to maintain the Historical Village.  We are currently in the midst of our annual membership drive, which this year is more important than ever.  If you received our letter in the mail reminding you it is time to donate, please know your generosity is much appreciated.  If you are new to the area and are interested in being a member and want to make a donation, please send your contact information along with you check to:  Tobacco Valley Board of History   PO Box 1452  Eureka, MT 59917.

Thank you.

 

Changes

Well, let’s start with what’s not happening at the moment and then move on to current activities.  Our winter fundraiser scheduled in March with the awesome Canadian band, The Wardens, was cancelled as the diligent thing to do considering all the factors.  Although we were very sorry to miss the opportunity to have these musicians perform here in the Tobacco Valley, it only made sense for them to be home and for us not to be gathering.  Friday quilting has been postponed for the foreseeable future and this is Jessquiltingcertainly a tough one to accept.  It made all of us realize that although one reason we sew together is to raise money for the Historical Village, a bigger part is sitting with this remarkable group of women, sharing stories, sharing laughs, offering each other love and support.

Despite the challenges of missing our Fridays together, there are things we are doing even while observing social distancing.  Cathy organized sewing face masks for the local medical clinic and a number of quilters helped on this.  Carmen shared her delicious tamales which makes any day seem much brighter.  Sally is busy getting seedlings and such ready for May gardens.  Lydna has a new puppy.  Cathryn took the quilt we had been working on home (the one we fondly call ‘piano keys’) so it wouldn’t feel bereft alone in the old school house. Despite the gray, snowy weather that we’ve been getting, flowers are starting to push up their first tender leaves.  And the lilac bushes at the Historical Village actually have buds.

No doubt we will be very appreciative when we get back together again.  Perhaps there will be so much talking that very little quilting will get done at first.

Things happening

It might seem a bit dreary in northwestern Montana but we are feeling cheerful at IMG_1894the Historical Village.  Besides Friday quilting which is something you should consider visiting, we are planning projects that will come to fruition in the spring.  All the buildings in the Historical Village are owned and maintained by the Tobacco Valley Board of History except one. That one, the small squarish white concrete building, is owned by Lincoln County and has housed various organizations over the years.  Currently the Lincoln County Library uses the back space in that building for their used book sales.  The front area is rented by TOPS for weekly meetings. The Eureka Chamber of Commerce which used to be housed in that building had a large sign frame in front of the building.  Over the years, the sign weathered and after the Chamber moved to their new location, the county told the Tobacco Valley Board of History they could use the sign frame if they wanted.

Now we are working hard to come up with information for a new sign that we hope will be beneficial for locals as well as tourists. We are going through our extensive photo archive to find pictures that will support the new text.  Our goal is to have a beautiful sign ready and up by Rendezvous Days in April. Fingers crossed!

We are also getting ready for our next big fundraiser.  The Wardens will perform in Wardens-Promo-3_Credit-Ray-SchmidtEureka on March 14th starting at 4pm at the Community Hall (Lodgecraft building), tickets at the door.  This is an easy way to support the Historical Village. Any of you who experienced the Wardens at their Trego show in 2018 know they are one fabulous band – both their music and their storytelling. We believe it will be a sell out event so plan to get there early on March 14th and grab your seats.

try something new

It does seem the ideal time to think about trying new things.  No doubt there are people out there who make New Year’s resolutions to learn a new language or take up skiing or make Cha Siu Bao (pork dumplings) and actually manage to do it.  We can take this as a sign that it is never too late to learn a skill, to take a different path, to try something new.  Many of our quilters are fine examples of this.IMG_2068

Recently we began to set up the next quilt we will be working on.  We had carefully put together the frame and measured to be sure to center the fabric for the quilt back.  Tacked the fabric all around and then realized the back had been pieced.  There was a seam down the middle but it hadn’t been ironed flat.  A detail we were determined to correct despite numerous sighs that this would require untacking the fabric in order to take it off to iron. Then Cathy and Lynda had the brainstorm to iron the backing while it was on the frame.  Although some of us scoffed at this idea, they actually managed to do it and do it well.

Although we have been around long enough to realize that not everything is possible – there are quite a lot of things that are which are worth trying.  As we begin 2020, we hope you consider trying something new to support your community and help yourself along the way.  We all certainly have a lot of potential waiting to be put to good use.

Upcoming events:

January 3 10am at Historical Village – Board of History meeting. Public welcome

March 14 4pm at Lodgecraft Building (Eureka) The Wardens Concert!

Quilting every Friday 10am – 3pm at the old school house in the Historical Village.

 

 

still a bit more

In the Tobacco Valley, we all just finished up a truly delightful whirlwind weekend of bazaars.  So many wonderful ones to visit from Riverstone Lodge to Trego Hall.  No doubt you picked up many wonderful gifts, but if there happens to be someone on your list you are still missing, the Historical Village bazaar continues this Friday (12/13) and next (12/20).  Warm hand-tied quilts in thick flannel, scrubbies, homemade biscotti, embroidered dishtowels, huckleberryIMG_1901 jam, baby quilts and more. Stop by either Friday from 10am – 3pm.

Perhaps you have all your holiday shopping finished up, but are considering donations before this year ends?  The Tobacco Valley Board of History always appreciates your support.  We are a 501(c)3 nonprofit and will promptly send a thank you for your records acknowledging your thoughtful gift.

The Tobacco Valley Board of History truly appreciates the support from everyone in the valley and those individuals who live other places who help us maintain our community’s history.  Thank you for stopping by our Christmas bazaar, attending Pint Night at HA brewery, sending in memberships, volunteering and helping in so many ways to keep the Historical Village a very special place in Eureka.

PO Box 1452. Eureka, MT 59917

Working

The quilters are well into their fall flurry.  One quilt is nearly done (you can tell when IMG_1865knees and elbows start touching), one tied, and another hand quilted one that was pieced by Sally started this week.  The large table with items for our Holiday Bazaar is overflowing with wonderful items made by the women: potholders, baby quilts, aprons, hand embroidered tea towels and pillow cases, casserole covers, hats, scrubbies and more. All proceeds go directly to help maintain the Historical Village. Mark your calendar for December 7.

And then the Tobacco Valley Board of History will be having a fundraiser at HA Brewery from 4:00 – 7:00pm on November 27th.  The Pint Night features live music, a huckleberry pie raffle, a good time connecting with friends, and $1 off every beverage sold that night given to help maintain our valley’s heritage.  Hope to see you there.  And in case you don’t know, HA Brewery now offers a fantastic menu so plan to come hungry.

 

And then it was fall

All at once the summer finished up and today the museum at the Historical Village will close for winter.  The quilters met last week at the old school house to begin their season.  They set up the first quilt to work on, a lovely Dresden plate design that belongs to a woman in Oklahoma.  After discussion about which pattern to use for quilting, we settled down to sew.  We hadn’t met as a group since the middle of May so our needles and thimbles felt a bit rusty but in no time at all we were in the flow.rafflequilt2020

A woman in Rollins, MT won last year’s raffle quilt. A lovely lavender one pieced by Vivian Vanleishout and quilted by the women at the Historical Village. This year’s raffle quilt is one of my favorites.  Each of the quilters made 2-4 unique blocks from various shades of blue and rose that Sally selected. After piecing them together, the fun began as each block needed to be quilted differently.  Raffle tickets go on sale soon and then next August at the county fair, a lucky winner will be selected.  It could be you (if you buy the right ticket). You are certainly welcome to stop by the old school any Friday between 10am – 3pm to see this special quilt.

As you put together your schedule for the upcoming season, you want to keep in mind a few important dates.  On Wednesday, November 27, the Tobacco Valley Board of History will have a Pint Night at HA Brewery.  A dollar for every beverage sold will be donated for maintenance of the Historical Village.  Always a fun evening (this is our third annual!) with a huckleberry pie to raffle and great music. Be sure to come out to enjoy the evening with us.

On March 14, another great fundraiser is a concert in Eureka featuring The Wardens, an awesome Canadian band who performed here in 2018.  Songs and stories of the backwoods, wildlife and life as a ‘government cowboy’ will fill the evening.  The concert starts at 4pm; tickets available at the door. More details to follow.

And just in case you live in the Tobacco Valley and are interested in learning to hand quilt or volunteering, know we would be glad to see you.  Stop by the school house in the Historical Village on Fridays when we are quilting to find what you might do.